A new era in IoT security: how organisations can combat the latest threats

09 November 2021

Keith Glancey, systems engineering manager, Infoblox

Keith Glancey, systems engineering manager, Infoblox

The Internet of Things (IoT) is not a new concept. For years, IoT devices have been widely and deeply embedde into our homes and businesses as well as society in general. But, when the pandemic struck last year, that level of integration suddenly became a security liability for thousands of companies.

The IoT challenge
Even before the pandemic struck, IoT security was far from easy. In fact, research discovered that one third (33%) of UK businesses believed there were around 1,000 unauthorised or nonbusiness related IoT devices – also known as Shadow IoT devices – connected to their enterprise networks. These devices can open a business up to attack and also enable unsanctioned “lurkers” to access any given network. One of the consequences of the rise of shadow IoT was a surge of 17 million cases of distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks across the globe in 2020 alone.

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Managing more connections

08 October 2021

Joost Grillaert, product manager, Nexans Telecom & Data Systems

Joost Grillaert, product manager, Nexans Telecom & Data Systems

Bandwidth demand continues to grow which in turn leads to a vast increase in the number of connections. The question is how to manage this, given the fact that space in a data centre is limited and expensive. Simply stuffing all your racks with ultra-high density connections isn’t recommended. So how then?

The drivers for this increase in bandwidth demand are tied to the rollout of 5G, IoT, the cloud, network convergence and more. For data centre operators, one of today’s main challenges is to significantly increase the number of connections without using more space for rack units and cabling. After all, space for cabling and hardware in data centres is finite and generally limited. Partly because the space itself is expensive, but also because a great deal of available real estate is taken up by cooling and other facility equipment.

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Selecting data centre ITE cabinets

31 August 2021

Michael Akinla, UK and Ireland area manager, Panduit FlexFusion Cabinets

Michael Akinla, UK and Ireland area manager, Panduit FlexFusion Cabinets

The continuing increase in compute density within data centres coupled with higher awareness of environmental sustainability requirements has driven the evolution of ITE cabinet designs.

How do you go about selecting a cabinet system that meets your compute and supply chain requirements and still offers customisation capabilities for future changes? A key initial decision is, does it meet your platform requirement? Whether you are a hyperscale, colocation, enterprise or edge site you need cabinets that are highly configurable with the modularity for future expansion or change.

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Data storage: bigger and faster comes at a cost

03 August 2021

By Brian Reed, vice president, product and alliances, Panasas

By Brian Reed, vice president, product and alliances, Panasas

When describing the latest technologies, we use the phrase “state of the art” without being aware that we’re actually referring to a moving target.

Let’s consider high-performance computing (HPC) storage solutions, which help keep pace with the massive volumes of information that need processing.

Increasingly, HPC is central in tackling some of the most complicated tasks, from gene sequencing to vaccine development.

But describing a HPC system as state of the art doesn’t really account for all the factors that customers planning large-scale storage must have in mind. Not only are they expensive to buy, maintain and operate but the costs of downtime and outages are often overlooked until it is too late.

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Data storage: spend wisely, plan for growth…and prepare for problems

22 June 2021

By Mark Radford, director enterprise sales UK, Infinidat

By Mark Radford, director enterprise sales UK, Infinidat

For most UK businesses the last 18 months have brought reality to what had previously been theoretical digital transformation plans.

Automation had already been happening in many parts of the data storage centre, data volumes were exploding and deep learning -- an element of artificial intelligence -- had also started to affect processes. There was the continuous danger of confusion and inefficiency, even complete project failure, unless you could prioritise essential infrastructure, capacity and performance needs under a lot of pressure.

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