Revolutionising data centre sustainability: the power of liquid immersion cooling technology

11 June 2024

Chris Carreiro, CTO, Park Place Technologies

Chris Carreiro, CTO, Park Place Technologies

Immersion cooling is a type of liquid cooling used to moderate data center equipment temperature by submerging it in a cooling fluid. Server immersion cooling helps to dissipate heat and keep components like CPUs performing optimally. Immersion cooling systems prove to be more efficient than traditional data center cooling methods (like computer room air conditioning, or CRAC) due to the increased thermal conductivity of most liquids compared to air.

Because 1-1.5% of electricity use across the globe is attributable to data centers, companies have been innovating to find a liquid cooling solution that can reduce that energy demand. Dielectric fluid immersion cooling is one solution that could increase CPU density in data centers while consuming less energy. 

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Critical communications – what’s occurring that’s new today?

06 June 2024

Duncan Swan, chief operating officer, British APCO

Duncan Swan, chief operating officer, British APCO

Critical Communications World (CCW) was back for it’s 25th anniversary in May returning to Dubai and a chance to see how east meets west on the exhibition floor and in the conference rooms.

The move towards using commercial mobile networks to deliver broadband critical communications is primarily based upon this being the most affordable way for most countries to deliver 4G and 5G based solutions. However, in Dubai it is a little different – with Nedaa, the Dubai Government secure networks provider, enhancing their mission critical TETRA radio network with a self-built 4G LTE network that offers 3GPP MCX broadband functionality for the Emirate amongst other Safe and Smart City applications. Their network supports both government and private clients – but specifically supporting key aspects of public safety and security.

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Cutting costs through circularity

06 June 2024

Lee Todd, head of advisory services within electrification service, ABB

Lee Todd, head of advisory services within electrification service, ABB

Digitalisation is now essential for day-to-day operations in most industries. Companies use it to maximise uptime and efficiency while cutting costs as much as possible, and for data centres in particular, digital technology helps to support the ‘always-on’ mindset.

The cost of outages in data centres has increased exponentially. Entire companies, currencies and markets now depend on uninterrupted service from information systems. Every second of downtime is revenue lost, and every disposal of otherwise perfectly good hardware brings carbon emissions with it. The costs to the data centre operator are threefold: environmental, financial, and reputational.

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Predictive maintenance: how IoT SIM connectivity can transform manufacturing

06 June 2024

Harry Bowlby, managing director, Spitfire Network Services

Harry Bowlby, managing director, Spitfire Network Services

We are living at the beginning of the era of ‘connected’ things. The applications of such technology are serving to improve life in general by advancing positive change across a wide spectrum of economic and social factors globally. Diving a bit deeper into the world of connected things we can find a whole range of IoT connectivity solutions with IoT SIM connectivity a huge growth area for the purpose of managing IoT assets.

For example, a smart controller can help retailers to manage their stock of refrigerated real estate more effectively. Such a device feeds back regular status reports (data) which can predict whether a refrigeration unit is likely to fail allowing it to pre-empt a service. And farmers (using a variety of sensors) can manage their crops much more efficiently, considering everything from soil moisture levels through to vehicle maintenance management.

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Improving security with Zero Trust networking

05 June 2024

Chris McKie, VP product marketing, security and networking solutions, Kaseya

Chris McKie, VP product marketing, security and networking solutions, Kaseya

With cyber risks steadily growing, organisations are increasingly looking to Zero Trust as a strategy to help defend their networks and boost their cyber resilience. The underlying principle of Zero Trust is well known by now: to never trust anything or anyone by default, including internal network devices, and to only grant verified users access to the data they really need.

It sounds simple enough. But for many organisations, putting Zero Trust into practice proves less straightforward than it sounds.

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